OTL





Jonathan. 24. Alopecia. Celiac. Vegetarian. Trying.

English. Español. 한국어. हिन्दी.
theatlantic:

jessbennett:

The Atlantic: The Problem with Women Who XO at Work
In which Rachel Simmons and I take on the Watergate of modern email etiquette: the workplace XO. 

XO has surfaced in the digital correspondence of everyone from Arianna Huffington to Nora Ephron. Wendy Williams, the talk-show host, says she wishes she could stop using it, but just can’t. Anne-Marie Slaughter—foreign-policy wonk, Princeton professor, and she who still can’t have it all—doesn’t xo, but knows several professional women who do. In Diane Sawyer’s newsroom, staffers say, the anchor uses xo so frequently that its omission can spark a major panic. 
“I feel like xo has taken on its own kind of life,” says Karli Kasonik, a Washington consultant.
“I do it, most women I know do it,” says Asie Mohtarez, a writer and social-media editor.
“In my field, you almost have to use it,” says Kristin Esposito, a yoga instructor in New York.


From this month’s issue. Read it!

"Why, then, has xo become such a fashionable accessory for women? Why, after all the strides we’ve made to be taken seriously at work, must we end our e‑mails with the digital equivalent of a pink Gelly Roll pen?”

theatlantic:

jessbennett:

The Atlantic: The Problem with Women Who XO at Work

In which Rachel Simmons and I take on the Watergate of modern email etiquette: the workplace XO. 

XO has surfaced in the digital correspondence of everyone from Arianna Huffington to Nora Ephron. Wendy Williams, the talk-show host, says she wishes she could stop using it, but just can’t. Anne-Marie Slaughter—foreign-policy wonk, Princeton professor, and she who still can’t have it all—doesn’t xo, but knows several professional women who do. In Diane Sawyer’s newsroom, staffers say, the anchor uses xo so frequently that its omission can spark a major panic. 

“I feel like xo has taken on its own kind of life,” says Karli Kasonik, a Washington consultant.

“I do it, most women I know do it,” says Asie Mohtarez, a writer and social-media editor.

“In my field, you almost have to use it,” says Kristin Esposito, a yoga instructor in New York.

From this month’s issue. Read it!

"Why, then, has xo become such a fashionable accessory for women? Why, after all the strides we’ve made to be taken seriously at work, must we end our e‑mails with the digital equivalent of a pink Gelly Roll pen?”

  1. coryfranchesca reblogged this from jessbennett
  2. capillaris reblogged this from jessbennett
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  7. alli-worthington reblogged this from jessbennett and added:
    The Atlantic: The Problem with Women Who XO at Work In which Rachel Simmons and I take on the Watergate of modern email...
  8. thesecretsavant reblogged this from northwangerabbey and added:
    Good article. Personally, I would not ever put xo or similar things in correspondences intended to be serious or...
  9. raulbangbang reblogged this from jessbennett
  10. savoir-femme reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    The Atlantic: The Problem with Women Who XO at Work XO has surfaced in the digital correspondence of everyone from...
  11. orlando2046 reblogged this from theatlantic
  12. ponyboy-curtiss reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    "Why, then, has xo become such a fashionable accessory for women? Why, after all the strides we’ve made to be taken...
  13. billdegrassenyeson reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    Again. I saw XO in this post and immediately thought of an individual with Turner Syndrome. Send help.
  14. theweekendwarriorrr reblogged this from getintherobot
  15. case-custom reblogged this from jessbennett