OTL





Jonathan. 24. Alopecia. Celiac. Vegetarian. Trying.

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Eating vegan food for dinner like a responsible adult. Spinach and kale salad with ginger - maple dressing & spicy sweet potato soup.

Eating vegan food for dinner like a responsible adult. Spinach and kale salad with ginger - maple dressing & spicy sweet potato soup.

stegosarah:

anepictimelord:

stegosarah:

If you ever feel like you’ve fucked up just remember that a whole TEAM of people designed this cash machine to be 15 inches off the ground and no one along the way thought ‘maybe this has a design flaw’

"Cash machine"

Yes. Here in the UK people call them cash machines, I know that’s an odd concept to get your head around but I think together we can do it

(via soupery)

My aunt just texted me to let me know that she had to attend a training session at her job today about not having sex with your coworkers on company peoperty. Because like three couples have been caught already this year. She works in an office building.

america-wakiewakie:

CNN Turns a Boring Royal Visit Into a Racist Nightmare in Just 13 Seconds | PolicyMic
How long does it take for the most trusted news source to turn a boring non-story into a racist, xenophobic nightmare?
About 13 seconds it turns out, and that’s only because CNN news correspondent Jeanne Moos takes her time narrating the intro [video here].
Earlier this month, Prince William, the Duchess of Cambridge and chubby-cheeked baby George took their first visit overseas. There’s not much to say about royal trips abroad, aside from cute playdate photos with the commoners, but CNN, bless their hearts, found a way to make us sit up and wonder what century they belong in.
Because if there’s anything Americans are good at, it’s finding new and horrible ways to make honoring indigenous traditions and experiencing other cultures about weird dances, things that baffle white people and butts.
(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: AP)

america-wakiewakie:

CNN Turns a Boring Royal Visit Into a Racist Nightmare in Just 13 Seconds | PolicyMic

How long does it take for the most trusted news source to turn a boring non-story into a racist, xenophobic nightmare?

About 13 seconds it turns out, and that’s only because CNN news correspondent Jeanne Moos takes her time narrating the intro [video here].

Earlier this month, Prince William, the Duchess of Cambridge and chubby-cheeked baby George took their first visit overseas. There’s not much to say about royal trips abroad, aside from cute playdate photos with the commoners, but CNN, bless their hearts, found a way to make us sit up and wonder what century they belong in.

Because if there’s anything Americans are good at, it’s finding new and horrible ways to make honoring indigenous traditions and experiencing other cultures about weird dances, things that baffle white people and butts.

(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: AP)

(via cyberpoleez)

africaisdonesuffering:

Women in Africa and the Diaspora: “Why Brown Girls Need Brown Dolls”

There have long been debates regarding Disney’s lack of diversity and further, the lack of diversity in dolls for children of color. While reading an article on this subject matter, I came across a comment that made me raise a brow.  A reader commented: “The color of these characters is not a big deal. Kids watching won’t see any difference if no difference is highlighted. They will grow up thinking anyone can fit into these roles.”

I’ve seen the sentiment expressed in this comment numerous times in an effort to brush off a call for diversity as “overreacting.” There’s this prevalent myth that kids do not see color. That they grow up colorblind not understanding race relations, but personal experience and social research has proven otherwise.

Let me start with experience:

During thanksgiving break, my 6 year old sister convinced me to play dolls with her. While brushing her doll’s hair, my sister said “Her hair is not like mine. She has white people’s hair.” Caught off guard by her statement, I asked “What do you mean white people hair Kelly?” At first she hesitated to respond but after a few minutes, she replied “Her hair is straight, not like mine.”  My 4 year old brother quickly followed “Yeah, and she’s not brown like you either.”

My sister’s comment proved that even at this young age, she noticed the differences in her doll baby and in herself. She noticed that her doll’s hair is straighter, that it has a small sharp nose, a skinny body. She noticed that her doll is white and that she is brown. Most importantly, she noticed that those characteristics listed all belonged to white women.

continue reading

(via iwannalaughallyourtearsaway)